caliban and other essays roberto fernandez retamar

/ username and password and try again. Rodo's essay is framed as a kind of commencement address delivered by the teacher, Prospero, to his male disciples. Ariel By Jose Enrique Rodo. Translated by Margaret Sayers Peden. Ariel, as Rod thought, but Caliban. Tempest, becomes in Retamars hands a powerful metaphor of their cultural situationboth in its marginality and its revolutionary potential. An early close confidant. What concerns Prospero is how to shore up high culture, which was rapidly being undermined by the egoism, bad taste and utilitarianism Rodo found in the democratic society of the United States. Cultural and literary essays by a Cuban poet, essayist, and professor of philology who is known for his meticulous efforts to dismantle Eurocentric colonial and neocolonial thought. In his version of this allegory, Rodo is more constructive and more Utopian, for he attempts to reconcile modern democracy, equal opportunity and social evolution with the harmonious development of the individual.

Caliban And Other Essays ( Roberto Fernandez



caliban and other essays roberto fernandez retamar



caliban and other essays roberto fernandez retamar

Roberto Fernández Retamar Translated by Edward Baker Foreword by Fredric Jameson.
Caliban and Other Essays.
Cultural and literary essays by a Cuban.
Become a kind of manifesto for Latin American and Caribbe an writers; the remaining four essays deal with Spanish and.

Also underlined is the importance. Unlike Cuba's Jose Marti and Argentina's Domingo Sarmiento, Rodo never visited the United States; instead, his observations on the rising tide of American vulgarity and mediocrity came from books and from such travel writing as Paul Bourget's novel 'Outre Mer.' What most alarmed him was. An erudite and widely respected hispanist, Retamar is known for his meticulous efforts to dismantle Eurocentric colonial and neocolonial thought. Thus Prospero urges his young students to dedicate themselves to the city of the future, to cultivating all that is devoted to 'the dissemination and defense of selfless spiritual idealism -art, science, morality, religious sincerity, a politics of ideas.'. One of the only issues I have is that he repeatedly name-drops people and writes something along the lines of "this is very obvious and clearly you've heard." I haven't! Password, sign in via your Institution, sign. This volume will be useful in courses dealing with contemporary Latin American culture. Yet it struck a responsive chord in generations of Latin American intellectuals precisely because of its insistence on the integrity of their culture.